Succession Planning

What's The Best Approach For Succession Planning?

Rachel Cwang Feb 6, 2017 8:42:00 AM

Any growing business needs a plan. Something that says how you will get from the current state to the multi-million (or billion if your up there) business that you wish it to be.  This plan involves many moving parts including product development, marketing, and sales. All of these pieces are crucial but you simply cannot move forward without the people to push you there. Think about what will happen as your current employees retire. Who will continue the vision? A succession plan is the piece of the talent management process that will answer that question. But while many of these plans outline who has the experience to take over, they do not necessarily tell you who has the personality to do so.

You may have an employee who has worked for the company for ten years and knows all of the ins and outs, but they may not have the temperament required to lead the company vision. The McQuaig System can be applied to succession planning in order to fill in that missing information.

Defining positions with the Job Survey

The first step to supplementing your succession plan with personality is creating the ideal temperamental profiles for each position. Imagine your organizational chart with a particular personality type associated with every role. These profiles will be based on the input of those who understand the day to day requirements of the job and are created by sending one or more relevant stakeholders the Job Survey.

Assessing potential with the Word Survey

Once the positions are defined, you can then assess which employees have the potential to fill them. This is done by comparing employees' Word Survey results with the ideal temperamental profile for a role and assessing the level of fit. The report will highlight the ways in which the employee is naturally suited for the role as well as what aspects may be challenging for them.

Developing potential with the Self-Development Survey

With the foresight into where an employee may have challenges in a higher role, you can begin to develop their skills pre-emptively. The Self-Development Survey allows the employee to choose action items that pertain to specific personality traits to expand into well-defined goals. This way they can create goals that will address the challenges they will likely face and prepare them to meet the expectations of the promotion.

Succession planning is an important factor of business growth therefore you want to make sure it is done effectively. In order to do so, you need to consider all pieces of the puzzle and this includes the personality of each employee that you intend to promote. The McQuaig System can simplify this aspect for you and provide the tools that make it easy to assess and develop potential from within your organization.

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Topics: Succession Planning, Corporate Culture, Talent Management

Rachel Cwang

Written by Rachel Cwang

Client Success Manager